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Tag Archives: united-states

Survival rates improve for in-hospital cardiac arrest

Survival rates improve for in-hospital cardiac arrest

ScienceDaily (Nov. 15, 2012) — A new study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that survival in patients who experience a cardiac arrest in the hospital has increased significantly over the past decade. The study, led by cardiologists at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute and the University of Missouri in Kansas City, also shows that this improvement has been accompanied by lower rates of neurological disability among those who survive Continue reading

Ultra-small drainage device may replace eye drop medications for some glaucoma patients

Ultra-small drainage device may replace eye drop medications for some glaucoma patients

ScienceDaily (Nov. 13, 2012) — A tiny medical device no larger than an eyelash may significantly reduce eye pressure in glaucoma patients and allow some to stop using eye-drop medications, according to year-one clinical trial results for the device. Results of the HYDRUS I clinical trial, which indicate successful control of eye pressure in all study participants, will be presented November 13 at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, jointly conducted this year with the Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology Continue reading

Ultra-small drainage device may replace eye drop medications for some glaucoma patients

Ultra-small drainage device may replace eye drop medications for some glaucoma patients

ScienceDaily (Nov. 13, 2012) — A tiny medical device no larger than an eyelash may significantly reduce eye pressure in glaucoma patients and allow some to stop using eye-drop medications, according to year-one clinical trial results for the device. Results of the HYDRUS I clinical trial, which indicate successful control of eye pressure in all study participants, will be presented November 13 at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, jointly conducted this year with the Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology Continue reading

Systematic incarceration of African American males is a wrong, costly path

Systematic incarceration of African American males is a wrong, costly path

ScienceDaily (Nov. 11, 2012) — Mental health experts from Meharry Medical College School of Medicine have released the first comprehensive report on the correlation between the incarceration of African American males and substance abuse and other health problems in the United States. Published in Frontiers in Psychology on the 12th of November, the report looks at decades of data concerning the African American population rates of incarceration and subsequent health issues. Continue reading

Scientific progress could be casualty in public health vs. Privacy debate over newborn blood samples, experts warn

Scientific progress could be casualty in public health vs. Privacy debate over newborn blood samples, experts warn

ScienceDaily (Nov. 7, 2012) — The tremendous potential public health benefits of research with blood samples left over after routine newborn screening must not be lost amidst controversy and litigation, say medical and bioethics experts in a commentary published in the journal Science Translational Medicine . “The potential value to biomedical research for improving both public health and individual health must be part of the public discussion about what should happen to residual dried blood samples from newborn screening,” says Michelle Huckaby Lewis, MD, JD, lead author of the commentary and Research Scholar at the Genetics and Public Policy Center of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics Continue reading

Scientific progress could be casualty in public health vs. Privacy debate over newborn blood samples, experts warn

Scientific progress could be casualty in public health vs. Privacy debate over newborn blood samples, experts warn

ScienceDaily (Nov. 7, 2012) — The tremendous potential public health benefits of research with blood samples left over after routine newborn screening must not be lost amidst controversy and litigation, say medical and bioethics experts in a commentary published in the journal Science Translational Medicine . “The potential value to biomedical research for improving both public health and individual health must be part of the public discussion about what should happen to residual dried blood samples from newborn screening,” says Michelle Huckaby Lewis, MD, JD, lead author of the commentary and Research Scholar at the Genetics and Public Policy Center of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics Continue reading

Small change in defibrillator therapy leads to huge benefits for heart patients

Small change in defibrillator therapy leads to huge benefits for heart patients

ScienceDaily (Nov. 6, 2012) — A new study shows that defibrillators — devices designed to detect and correct dangerous heart rhythms — can help people with heart disease live longer, and with a much better quality of life, than they do now. A small, very simple change in the way physicians set or programmed the device led to a dramatic 80 to 90 percent reduction in inappropriate therapies — potentially painful and anxiety-provoking shocks delivered for rhythms that aren’t dangerous or life threatening Continue reading

Studies show power of epidemiology research; Underscore need to address health disparities

Studies show power of epidemiology research; Underscore need to address health disparities

ScienceDaily (Nov. 5, 2012) — Heart disease risk factors are widespread among Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States, with 80 percent of men and 71 percent of women having at least one risk factor for heart disease, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS-SOL) is the largest study to date to examine the prevalence of heart disease risk factors — high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, diabetes, and smoking — within a diverse Hispanic/Latino population. Continue reading

Cardiac bypass surgery superior to non-surgical procedure for adults with diabetes and heart disease

Cardiac bypass surgery superior to non-surgical procedure for adults with diabetes and heart disease

ScienceDaily (Nov. 4, 2012) — Adults with diabetes and multi-vessel coronary heart disease who underwent cardiac bypass surgery had better overall heart-related outcomes than those who underwent an artery-opening procedure to improve blood flow to the heart muscle, according to the results from an international study Continue reading

When considering bariatric surgery, think about bones

When considering bariatric surgery, think about bones

ScienceDaily (Nov. 2, 2012) — Bariatric surgery, which significantly curtails the amount of food a person can eat, is the most effective treatment against obesity and is being recognized as a potentially valuable tool in the fight against diabetes related to obesity. It is being performed on increasing numbers of people worldwide, including teenagers. Continue reading