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Tag Archives: united-states

First patients in US receive non-surgical device of sunken chest syndrome

First patients in US receive non-surgical device of sunken chest syndrome

ScienceDaily (Nov. 21, 2012) — Surgeons at Children’s Hospital of The King’s Daughters (CHKD) have fitted a patient with a device that might eliminate the need for surgery in some patients with one of the world’s most common chest deformities, pectus excavatum, often called sunken chest syndrome. Continue reading

First report of state-level COPD prevalence in U.S.

First report of state-level COPD prevalence in U.S.

ScienceDaily (Nov. 21, 2012) — The age-adjusted prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) varies considerably within the United States, from less than 4 percent of the population in Washington and Minnesota to more than 9 percent in Alabama and Kentucky Continue reading

Low levels of donor-specific antibodies increase risks for transplant recipients

Low levels of donor-specific antibodies increase risks for transplant recipients

ScienceDaily (Nov. 15, 2012) — Kidney transplant recipients who have even very low levels of preformed antibodies directed against a donated kidney have a significantly increased risk of organ rejection and kidney failure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The findings could help clinicians provide better donor-recipient matches and tailor recipients’ immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation Continue reading

Preterm birth may be prevented with a few proven treatments, experts say

Preterm birth may be prevented with a few proven treatments, experts say

ScienceDaily (Nov. 15, 2012) — Lowering preterm birth rates by an average of 5 percent across 39 high-resource countries, including the United States, by 2015 would prevent prematurity for 58,000 babies a year, a group of international experts said on November 15 Continue reading

Survival rates improve for in-hospital cardiac arrest

Survival rates improve for in-hospital cardiac arrest

ScienceDaily (Nov. 15, 2012) — A new study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that survival in patients who experience a cardiac arrest in the hospital has increased significantly over the past decade. The study, led by cardiologists at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute and the University of Missouri in Kansas City, also shows that this improvement has been accompanied by lower rates of neurological disability among those who survive Continue reading

Survival rates improve for in-hospital cardiac arrest

Survival rates improve for in-hospital cardiac arrest

ScienceDaily (Nov. 15, 2012) — A new study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that survival in patients who experience a cardiac arrest in the hospital has increased significantly over the past decade. The study, led by cardiologists at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute and the University of Missouri in Kansas City, also shows that this improvement has been accompanied by lower rates of neurological disability among those who survive Continue reading

Ultra-small drainage device may replace eye drop medications for some glaucoma patients

Ultra-small drainage device may replace eye drop medications for some glaucoma patients

ScienceDaily (Nov. 13, 2012) — A tiny medical device no larger than an eyelash may significantly reduce eye pressure in glaucoma patients and allow some to stop using eye-drop medications, according to year-one clinical trial results for the device. Results of the HYDRUS I clinical trial, which indicate successful control of eye pressure in all study participants, will be presented November 13 at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, jointly conducted this year with the Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology Continue reading

Ultra-small drainage device may replace eye drop medications for some glaucoma patients

Ultra-small drainage device may replace eye drop medications for some glaucoma patients

ScienceDaily (Nov. 13, 2012) — A tiny medical device no larger than an eyelash may significantly reduce eye pressure in glaucoma patients and allow some to stop using eye-drop medications, according to year-one clinical trial results for the device. Results of the HYDRUS I clinical trial, which indicate successful control of eye pressure in all study participants, will be presented November 13 at the 116th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, jointly conducted this year with the Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology Continue reading

Systematic incarceration of African American males is a wrong, costly path

Systematic incarceration of African American males is a wrong, costly path

ScienceDaily (Nov. 11, 2012) — Mental health experts from Meharry Medical College School of Medicine have released the first comprehensive report on the correlation between the incarceration of African American males and substance abuse and other health problems in the United States. Published in Frontiers in Psychology on the 12th of November, the report looks at decades of data concerning the African American population rates of incarceration and subsequent health issues. Continue reading

Scientific progress could be casualty in public health vs. Privacy debate over newborn blood samples, experts warn

Scientific progress could be casualty in public health vs. Privacy debate over newborn blood samples, experts warn

ScienceDaily (Nov. 7, 2012) — The tremendous potential public health benefits of research with blood samples left over after routine newborn screening must not be lost amidst controversy and litigation, say medical and bioethics experts in a commentary published in the journal Science Translational Medicine . “The potential value to biomedical research for improving both public health and individual health must be part of the public discussion about what should happen to residual dried blood samples from newborn screening,” says Michelle Huckaby Lewis, MD, JD, lead author of the commentary and Research Scholar at the Genetics and Public Policy Center of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics Continue reading