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COPD patients breathe easier with lung flute, study shows

COPD patients breathe easier with lung flute, study shows

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) report improved symptoms and health status when they use a hand-held respiratory device called the Lung Flute®, according to a new study by the University at Buffalo. Usually caused by smoking, COPD, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema, is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. Continue reading

Immune activity shortly after surgery holds big clue to recovery rate

Immune activity shortly after surgery holds big clue to recovery rate

The millions of people who undergo major surgery each year have no way of knowing how long it will take them to recover from the operation. Continue reading

Study questions accuracy of lung cancer screens in some geographic regions

Study questions accuracy of lung cancer screens in some geographic regions

A new analysis of published studies found that FDG-PET technology is less accurate in diagnosing lung cancer versus benign disease in regions where infections like histoplasmosis or tuberculosis are common. Continue reading

Reversing the effects of pulmonary fibrosis with a microRNA mimic

Reversing the effects of pulmonary fibrosis with a microRNA mimic

Yale University researchers are studying a potential new treatment that reverses the effects of pulmonary fibrosis, a respiratory disease in which scars develop in the lungs and severely hamper breathing. Continue reading

Artificial liver tested as potential therapy for patients with alcohol-related organ failure

Artificial liver tested as potential therapy for patients with alcohol-related organ failure

Cedars-Sinai physicians and scientists are testing a novel, human cell based, bioartificial liver support system for patients with acute liver failure, often a fatal diagnosis. “The quest for a device that can fill in for the function of the liver, at least temporarily, has been underway for decades. A bioartificial liver, also known as a BAL, could potentially sustain patients with acute liver failure until their own livers self-repair,” said Steven D Continue reading

New guidelines issued for managing peri- and postoperative atrial fibrillation

New guidelines issued for managing peri- and postoperative atrial fibrillation

The American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS) has released new evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of perioperative and postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) and flutter for thoracic surgical procedures. Continue reading

New hepatitis c medication in children to be studied

New hepatitis c medication in children to be studied

After the success of a new drug treatment in adults with hepatitis C infection, a Saint Louis University pediatric researcher is testing the safety and efficacy of the medications in children. Part of a multi-center clinical study, SLU is the only center in the region that will examine a combination of two drugs — Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin — in children between ages 3 and 17 Continue reading

Melanoma risk found to have genetic determinant

Melanoma risk found to have genetic determinant

A leading Dartmouth researcher, working with The Melanoma Genetics Consortium, GenoMEL, an international research consortium, co-authored a paper published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that proves longer telomeres increase the risk of melanoma. “For the first time, we have established that the genes controlling the length of these telomeres play a part in the risk of developing melanoma,” said lead author of the study Mark Iles, PhD, School of Medicine at the University of Leeds (UK). Telomeres are a part of the genome that function like the plastic caps of your shoelaces, which prevent the laces from fraying Continue reading

Cancer-fighting cocktail demonstrates promising results as treatment for advanced cervical cancer

Cancer-fighting cocktail demonstrates promising results as treatment for advanced cervical cancer

Combining a standard chemotherapy drug with a second drug that stops cells from dividing improves both the survival and response rates for those with advanced cervical cancer, a new study by UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers finds. The cancer-fighting cocktail, which combines the chemotherapy drug cisplatin with pemetrexed — an agent that stops cancer cells from dividing — showed promising results for advanced, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer. “We found that pemetrexed combined with cisplatin is less toxic, well tolerated, and should be developed for further treatment of cervical cancer,” said gynecologic oncology specialist Dr. Continue reading

Imaging identifies asymptomatic people at risk for stroke

Imaging identifies asymptomatic people at risk for stroke

Imaging can be a cost-effective way to identify people at risk for stroke who might benefit from aggressive intervention, according to a new modeling study published online in the journal Radiology . The study looked at people with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis, a narrowing of the major blood vessels supplying blood to the head due to atherosclerosis, or plaque buildup. Carotid artery stenosis is the primary cause of up to 20 percent of ischemic strokes, which result from an obstruction within a blood vessel and make up 85 percent of all strokes. Continue reading