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Tag Archives: united-states

Exit strategy: Is it time to rethink the VA healthcare system?

Exit strategy: Is it time to rethink the VA healthcare system?

As the federal government plans its exit strategy from the war, now may be the time for it to rethink its role in providing health care to veterans, says a Perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine. “To simply go on doing more of the same is to fail to recognize the challenge that the Veterans Health Administration’s cost and population structure pose in the longer run,” said William Weeks, from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice, and David Auerbach, from the RAND Corporation, in the August issue of NEJM . The VA incurs high fixed costs of a brick-and-mortar health care system, the largest salaried workforce in the federal government, and a large administration.To sustain this system, the VA has pursued a strategy of increasing enrollment among veterans — about two-thirds of enrollees use VA services — which has led to calls for expanding and building more facilities. Continue reading

Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could increase childhood survival in Africa

Expanding age of eligibility for measles vaccination could increase childhood survival in Africa

Expanding the age of eligibility for measles vaccination from 12 to 15 months could have potentially large effects on coverage in Africa, according to a new report published by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Continue reading

Newborn screening expansion offers early diagnosis and treatment to infants with SCID

Newborn screening expansion offers early diagnosis and treatment to infants with SCID

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. Data from 11 newborn screening programs published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association ( JAMA ) showed the rate of SCID in newborns is higher than previously thought and believed to be 1 in 58,000 Continue reading

Coronary arteries hold heart-regenerating cells

Coronary arteries hold heart-regenerating cells

Endothelial cells residing in the coronary arteries can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. The findings, published recently in Cell Reports , offer insights into how the heart maintains itself and could lead to new strategies for repairing the heart when it fails after a heart attack. The heart has long been considered to be an organ without regenerative potential, said Antonis Hatzopoulos, Ph.D., associate professor of Medicine and Cell and Developmental Biology Continue reading

Ruxolitinib for myelofibrosis: Indication of considerable added benefit

Ruxolitinib for myelofibrosis: Indication of considerable added benefit

Ruxolitinib (trade name: Jakavi) has been approved since August 2012 for the treatment of adults with myelofibrosis. Continue reading

New mouse model points to therapy for liver disease

New mouse model points to therapy for liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation Continue reading

New treatment for obstructive sleep apnea

New treatment for obstructive sleep apnea

University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center is the first in Ohio and among the first in the United States to begin offering a new FDA-approved treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Continue reading

Ebola outbreak highlights global disparities in health-care resources

Ebola outbreak highlights global disparities in health-care resources

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease that has claimed more than 1,000 lives in West Africa this year poses a serious, ongoing threat to that region: the spread to capital cities and Nigeria — Africa’s most populous nation — presents new challenges for healthcare professionals. The situation has garnered significant attention and fear around the world, but proven public health measures and sharpened clinical vigilance will contain the epidemic and thwart a global spread, according to a new commentary by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health. Continue reading

U.S. immigration associated with rise in smoking among Latinos, Asians

U.S. immigration associated with rise in smoking among Latinos, Asians

Immigration to the U.S. may result in increased smoking in Latino and Asian women, according to new research from sociologists at Rice University, Duke University and the University of Southern California. The study, “Gender, Acculturation and Smoking Behavior Among U.S Continue reading

Slowing brain functions linked to increased risk of stroke, death

Slowing brain functions linked to increased risk of stroke, death

Cognitive abilities such as memory and attention are not only important after a stroke but also before; according to Declining memory and cognitive ability may increase the risk of stroke in adults over age 65. After stroke, cognitive function declined almost twice as fast Continue reading