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Tag Archives: united-states

Tree and human health may be linked

Tree and human health may be linked

Jan. 16, 2013 — Evidence is increasing from multiple scientific fields that exposure to the natural environment can improve human health. In a new study by the U.S. Continue reading

To prevent injuries, young athletes may need to play more just for fun

To prevent injuries, young athletes may need to play more just for fun

Jan. 11, 2013 — One way to avoid injuries in young athletes may be for them to simply spend more time in unorganized free play such as pick-up games, a Loyola University Medical Study has found. Continue reading

Declining access to electroconvulsive therapy: A clinical choice or an economic one?

Declining access to electroconvulsive therapy: A clinical choice or an economic one?

Jan. Continue reading

First oral drug for spinal cord injury improves movement in mice

First oral drug for spinal cord injury improves movement in mice

Jan. 8, 2013 — An experimental oral drug given to mice after a spinal cord injury was effective at improving limb movement after the injury, a new study shows. The compound efficiently crossed the blood-brain barrier, did not increase pain and showed no toxic effects to the animals. Continue reading

Cancer screening unlikely to benefit patients with a short life expectancy: Less than 10 years and risks are likely to outweigh benefits

Cancer screening unlikely to benefit patients with a short life expectancy: Less than 10 years and risks are likely to outweigh benefits

Jan. 8, 2013 — Breast and colorectal cancer screening should be targeted towards patients with a life expectancy greater than 10 years: for any shorter life expectancy the harms are likely to outweigh the benefits, concludes a study published on the British Medical Journal January 8 Continue reading

Concerns raised over the effectiveness of a costly and invasive procedure for melanoma

Concerns raised over the effectiveness of a costly and invasive procedure for melanoma

Jan. 8, 2013 — A special report published by the British Medical Journal on January 8 finds that thousands of melanoma patients around the world are undergoing an expensive and invasive procedure called sentinel node biopsy, despite a lack of clear evidence and concerns that it may do more harm than good Continue reading

First study of Oregon’s Hmong reveals surprising influences on cancer screenings

First study of Oregon’s Hmong reveals surprising influences on cancer screenings

Jan. 8, 2013 — Cervical cancer rates for Hmong women are among the highest in the nation, yet past research has shown that cervical and breast cancer screening rates for this population are low — in part because of the Hmong’s strong patriarchal culture. Continue reading

Folk remedies often offered during breastfeeding, survey finds

Folk remedies often offered during breastfeeding, survey finds

Jan. 7, 2013 — Breastfeeding can be a difficult time for both mother and baby, so using cabbage leaves and tea bags to ease pain or eating oatmeal to increase milk production are among the folk remedies that women pass along to new mothers seeking help. Continue reading

Physical education requirement at four-year universities at all-time low

Physical education requirement at four-year universities at all-time low

Jan. 7, 2013 — Even as policy makers and health experts point to an increased need for exercise, more than half of four-year colleges and universities in the United States have dropped physical education requirements compared to historic levels. Almost every U.S Continue reading

Shifting the balance between good fat and bad fat

Shifting the balance between good fat and bad fat

Jan. Continue reading