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New optimal screening threshold for gestational diabetes in twin pregnancies: Ideal 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test cutoff ≥135 mg/dl

New optimal screening threshold for gestational diabetes in twin pregnancies: Ideal 1-hour 50-g glucose challenge test cutoff ≥135 mg/dl

A common complication, gestational diabetes affects approximately 6-7% of pregnant women. Currently, screening is done in two steps to help identify patients most at risk; however, the suggested levels for additional testing were based on singleton pregnancy data Continue reading

Hygienic funerals, better protection for health workers offer best chance to stop Ebola

Hygienic funerals, better protection for health workers offer best chance to stop Ebola

Hygienic funeral practices, case isolation, contact tracing with quarantines, and better protection for health care workers are the keys to stopping the Ebola epidemic that continues to expand in West Africa, researchers said today in a new report in the journal Science . Continuing the status quo of intervention efforts that were in place as of Sept. 19 would allow continued expansion of the epidemic by about 224 new cases daily in Liberia by Dec. Continue reading

Genetic factors behind surviving or dying from Ebola shown in mouse study

Genetic factors behind surviving or dying from Ebola shown in mouse study

A newly developed mouse model suggests that genetic factors are behind the mild-to-deadly range of reactions to the Ebola virus. People exposed to Ebola vary in how the virus affects them. Some completely resist the disease, others suffer moderate to severe illness and recover, while those who are most susceptible succumb to bleeding, organ failure and shock Continue reading

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that could help overcome one of regenerative medicine’s significant obstacles. The researchers will present their technique at the 168th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), held October 27-31, 2014, at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown Hotel Continue reading

What do American babies eat? A lot depends on Mom’s socioeconomic background

What do American babies eat? A lot depends on Mom’s socioeconomic background

You have to be at least 2 years old to be covered by U.S. dietary guidelines. Continue reading

Novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions developed by engineers

Novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions developed by engineers

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain. In order to make the study possible, researchers have developed a novel ultrasound technology that makes screening cheaper and much easier, making it possible to reach a large number of people and even infants. Continue reading

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel consisting of short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube “porins” have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications. Continue reading

Clean smell doesn’t always mean clean air

Clean smell doesn’t always mean clean air

Some of the same chemical reactions that occur in the atmosphere as a result of smog and ozone are actually taking place in your house while you are cleaning. A researcher in Drexel’s College of Engineering is taking a closer look at these reactions, which involve an organic compound -called limonene- that provides the pleasant smell of cleaning products and air fresheners. His research will help to determine what byproducts these sweet-smelling compounds are adding to the air while we are using them to remove germs and odors. Continue reading

Improving breast cancer chemo by testing patient’s tumors in a dish

Improving breast cancer chemo by testing patient’s tumors in a dish

One of the tragic realities of cancer is that the drugs used to treat it are highly toxic and their effectiveness varies unpredictably from patient to patient. However, a new “tumor-in-a-dish” technology is poised to change this reality by rapidly assessing how effective specific anti-cancer cocktails will be on an individual’s cancer before chemotherapy begins. A team of biomedical engineers at Vanderbilt University headed by Assistant Professor Melissa Skala has developed the technique, which uses fluorescence imaging to monitor the response of three-dimensional chunks of tumors removed from patients and exposed to different anti-cancer drugs. Continue reading

Breathe easier: Get your vitamin D

Breathe easier: Get your vitamin D

Asthma, which inflames and narrows the airways, has become more common in recent years. Continue reading