List/Grid

Tag Archives: University

Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode

Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode

The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research led by Yale researchers predicts. The findings are published online first in The Lancet Infectious Diseases . A team of seven scientists from Yale’s Schools of Public Health and Medicine and the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare in Liberia developed a mathematical transmission model of the viral disease and applied it to Liberia’s most populous county, Montserrado, an area already hard hit Continue reading

Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode

Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode

The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research led by Yale researchers predicts. The findings are published online first in The Lancet Infectious Diseases . A team of seven scientists from Yale’s Schools of Public Health and Medicine and the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare in Liberia developed a mathematical transmission model of the viral disease and applied it to Liberia’s most populous county, Montserrado, an area already hard hit Continue reading

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors

Just like those of humans, insect guts are full of microbes, and the microbiota can influence the insect’s ability to transmit diseases. A study published on October 23rd in PLOS Pathogens reports that a bacterium isolated from the gut of an Aedes mosquito can reduce infection of mosquitoes by malaria parasites and dengue virus Continue reading

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors

Just like those of humans, insect guts are full of microbes, and the microbiota can influence the insect’s ability to transmit diseases. A study published on October 23rd in PLOS Pathogens reports that a bacterium isolated from the gut of an Aedes mosquito can reduce infection of mosquitoes by malaria parasites and dengue virus Continue reading

Cancer exosome ‘micro factories’ aid in cancer progression

Cancer exosome ‘micro factories’ aid in cancer progression

Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA (miRNA) molecules resulting in tumor growth. They do so with the help of proteins, such as one named Dicer. Continue reading

YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer

YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer

Federal Express® and UPS® are no match for the human body when it comes to distribution. Continue reading

Paralyzed patients have weaker bones, higher risk of fractures than expected

Paralyzed patients have weaker bones, higher risk of fractures than expected

People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a new study by a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI). The results suggest that physicians need to begin therapies for spinal cord injury patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength. The data also serve as a warning to physicians treating patients with osteoporosis to think beyond the standard bone density test when assessing risks of hip and other fractures Continue reading

Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy

Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy

A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development. “These findings are important because studies of prenatal drug exposure in humans are always limited by not knowing if infant nervous system damage was due to the effects of a specific drug, such as cocaine, or the effects of other associated factors, such as maternal depression, poor prenatal care and other drug use, that are often linked with maternal drug use during pregnancy,” said Philip Sanford Zeskind, PhD, lead author of the study published October 22 in the journal PLOS ONE . “The discovery of the similar spectral characteristic in rat pup vocalizations will allow for translational analyses that can be used to detect the isolated effects of cocaine or similar drugs on brain limbic mechanisms common to humans, rodents and other mammals,” said Zeskind, a researcher at Levine Children’s Hospital at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, North Carolina and a research professor of psychology and pediatrics at UNC Continue reading

Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Numerous studies have shown that individuals with an alcohol use disorder perform worse than those without one on multiple neurocognitive domains of function following detoxification from alcohol, although the level of impairment can vary widely among individuals. A new study of the degree of neurocognitive recovery in treatment-seeking alcohol dependent individuals (ALC) — with varied degrees of smoking status — during the first eight months of sustained abstinence from alcohol has found that smoking status influenced the rate and level of recovery Continue reading

Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol

Numerous studies have shown that individuals with an alcohol use disorder perform worse than those without one on multiple neurocognitive domains of function following detoxification from alcohol, although the level of impairment can vary widely among individuals. A new study of the degree of neurocognitive recovery in treatment-seeking alcohol dependent individuals (ALC) — with varied degrees of smoking status — during the first eight months of sustained abstinence from alcohol has found that smoking status influenced the rate and level of recovery Continue reading