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Tag Archives: Virus

Ebola’s evolutionary roots more ancient than previously thought

Ebola’s evolutionary roots more ancient than previously thought

A new study is helping to rewrite Ebola’s family history. Continue reading

German academies call for consequences from the Ebola virus epidemic

German academies call for consequences from the Ebola virus epidemic

The Ebola virus is spreading rapidly and to an unexpected extent. The outbreak does not follow the patterns experienced in the past and the virus shows a new disease dynamic in regions where it has never been recorded before. For this reason, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, acatech — the German Academy of Science and Engineering, and the Union of the German Academies of Sciences and Humanities have presented a statement on the Ebola epidemic today Continue reading

Ebola screening begins at Heathrow

Ebola screening begins at Heathrow

unable to retrieve full-text contentPassengers arriving at Heathrow airport from Ebola-affected countries have been screened by health officials for symptoms of the virus. Continue reading

Universal Ebola drug target identified by researchers

Universal Ebola drug target identified by researchers

University of Utah biochemists have reported a new drug discovery tool against the Ebola virus. According to a study published in this week’s online edition of Protein Science , they have produced a molecule, known as a peptide mimic, that displays a functionally critical region of the virus that is universally conserved in all known species of Ebola. This new tool can be used as a drug target in the discovery of anti-Ebola agents that are effective against all known strains and likely future strains Continue reading

Ebola genome browser now online to aid researchers’ response to crisis

Ebola genome browser now online to aid researchers’ response to crisis

The UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute late Tuesday (Sept. 30) released a new Ebola genome browser to assist global efforts to develop a vaccine and antiserum to help stop the spread of the Ebola virus. The team led by University of California, Santa Cruz researcher Jim Kent worked around the clock for the past week, communicating with international partners to gather and present the most current data. Continue reading

Stem cell transplant does not cure SHIV/AIDS after irradiation of infected rhesus macaques

Stem cell transplant does not cure SHIV/AIDS after irradiation of infected rhesus macaques

A study published on September 25th in PLOS Pathogens reports a new primate model to test treatments that might cure HIV/AIDS and suggests answers to questions raised by the “Berlin patient,” the only human thought to have been cured so far. Being HIV-positive and having developed leukemia, the Berlin patient underwent irradiation followed by a bone-marrow transplant from a donor with a mutation that abolishes the function of the CCR5 gene. Continue reading

Dengue fever, malaria in the Himalayas

Dengue fever, malaria in the Himalayas

Research by Nepalese and German scientists from the Nepal Health Research Council, Goethe University and the LOEWE Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre analyzes the current situation of these diseases in the Himalayan country of Nepal and highlights how they profit from climate change and globalization. Dengue fever: high risk, little knowledge Although the first case of dengue fever in Nepal was only reported in 2004, the country was shaken by an epidemic already in 2010 Continue reading

Possible 6,800 new Ebola cases this month, research predicts

Possible 6,800 new Ebola cases this month, research predicts

New research published today in the online journal PLoS Outbreaks predicts new Ebola cases could reach 6,800 in West Africa by the end of the month if new control measures are not enacted. Arizona State University and Harvard University researchers also discovered through modelling analysis that the rate of rise in cases significantly increased in August in Liberia and Guinea, around the time that a mass quarantine was put in place, indicating that the mass quarantine efforts may have made the outbreak worse than it would have been otherwise. Deteriorating living and hygiene conditions in some of the quarantined areas sparked riots last month Continue reading

Bad cold or Enterovirus 68? Infectious diseases specialist answers common questions

Bad cold or Enterovirus 68? Infectious diseases specialist answers common questions

Does your child have Enterovirus 68 or just a bad cold? It can be hard to tell the difference between the two, but Pia Pannaraj , MD, Infectious Diseases specialist at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles speaks on how parents should treat their kids’ symptoms and when to seek medical attention Continue reading

Tolerating, not fighting, viruses a viable survival strategy

Tolerating, not fighting, viruses a viable survival strategy

In ecology, disease tolerance is defined as a host strategy not to fight a pathogen tooth and nail, but rather tolerate it to live (and survive) better in the long term. One key feature of tolerance is that the disease only progresses very slowly — if at all — even if the host carries a high pathogen load. Roland Regoes, a senior scientist at ETH Zurich’s Institute of Theoretical Biology, has now transferred this approach to HIV Continue reading