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Tag Archives: Work

The genetics of coping with HIV

The genetics of coping with HIV

We respond to infections in two fundamental ways. Continue reading

Smoking, schizophrenia linked by alterations in brain nicotine signals

Smoking, schizophrenia linked by alterations in brain nicotine signals

Schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking. A growing body of research suggests that the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems, in part, from an effort by patients to use nicotine to self-medicate symptoms and cognitive impairment associated with the disease. Continue reading

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain Continue reading

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. Continue reading

Brain inflammation dramatically disrupts memory retrieval networks, study finds

Brain inflammation dramatically disrupts memory retrieval networks, study finds

Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to UC Irvine neuroscientists Jennifer Czerniawski and John Guzowski. Continue reading

Re-analysis of clinical trial data can change conclusions in one-third of studies

Re-analysis of clinical trial data can change conclusions in one-third of studies

As many as one-third of previously published randomized clinical trials could be re-analyzed in ways that modify the conclusions of how many or what types of patients need to be treated, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. A culture that fails to encourage data sharing makes such re-analysis of the data extremely rare, the researchers said. They were able to identify only 37 published re-analyses over more than three decades of research. Continue reading

Dynamic duo takes out cellular trash: Research finds how dead cells are removed from body

Dynamic duo takes out cellular trash: Research finds how dead cells are removed from body

In most of the tissues of the body, specialized immune cells are entrusted with the task of engulfing the billions of dead cells that are generated every day. When these garbage disposals don’t do their job, dead cells and their waste products rapidly pile up, destroying healthy tissue and leading to autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. Continue reading

New gene mutations for Wilms tumor found

New gene mutations for Wilms tumor found

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and the Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s Medical Center, Dallas, have made significant progress in defining new genetic causes of Wilms tumor, a type of kidney cancer found only in children. Wilms tumor is the most common childhood genitourinary tract cancer and the third most common solid tumor of childhood Continue reading

Knowing how bacteria take out trash could lead to new antibiotics

Knowing how bacteria take out trash could lead to new antibiotics

A collaborative team of scientists including biochemist Peter Chien at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has reconstructed how bacteria tightly control their growth and division, a process known as the cell cycle, by specifically destroying key proteins through regulated protein degradation. Regulated protein degradation uses specific enzymes called energy dependent proteases to selective destroy certain targets. Because regulated protein degradation is critical for bacterial virulence and invasion, understanding how these proteases function should help to uncover pathways that can be targeted by new antibiotics Continue reading

Discharged patients return to ER because ‘better safe than sorry’

Discharged patients return to ER because ‘better safe than sorry’

Patients who return to the emergency department within a few days of discharge do so principally because they are anxious about their symptoms and have lost trust in other parts of the health care system, according to the results of a study published online today in Annals of Emergency Medicine . “When asked why they did not follow up as an outpatient, patients reported feeling that their symptoms were too severe to wait until their scheduled appointment or being instructed to return to the ER by the outpatient provider they contacted,” said lead study author Kristin Rising, MD, of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, Penn. The paper goes on to say that patients’ “decision to return to the emergency department was driven largely by fear and uncertainty regarding their medical conditions as well as a lack of trust in the system to be responsive to their needs.” Other prominent themes related to patients’ limited use of outpatient care included problems accessing care because of lack of insurance, dissatisfaction with a primary care physician and lack of trust in their primary physician Continue reading