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Tag Archives: Work

On the frontiers of cyborg science: Development of electronic-brain relationship

On the frontiers of cyborg science: Development of electronic-brain relationship

No longer just fantastical fodder for sci-fi buffs, cyborg technology is bringing us tangible progress toward real-life electronic skin, prosthetics and ultraflexible circuits. Now taking this human-machine concept to an unprecedented level, pioneering scientists are working on the seamless marriage between electronics and brain signaling with the potential to transform our understanding of how the brain works — and how to treat its most devastating diseases. Their presentation is taking place at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. Continue reading

Treatment developed by biologists shows promise in fighting fibrotic disease

Treatment developed by biologists shows promise in fighting fibrotic disease

A decade after first identifying serum amyloid P (SAP) as a key protein in human blood that controls routine tissue-related processes from scarring to healing, two Texas A&M University scientists and the biotechnology company they co-founded continue to make encouraging progress in the fight against fibrotic disease, a broad class of chronic conditions associated with an estimated 45 percent of U.S. deaths per year. Texas A&M biologists Richard Gomer and Darrell Pilling have collaborated in recent years on several SAP-related advances, from establishing Promedior Inc Continue reading

Treatment developed by biologists shows promise in fighting fibrotic disease

Treatment developed by biologists shows promise in fighting fibrotic disease

A decade after first identifying serum amyloid P (SAP) as a key protein in human blood that controls routine tissue-related processes from scarring to healing, two Texas A&M University scientists and the biotechnology company they co-founded continue to make encouraging progress in the fight against fibrotic disease, a broad class of chronic conditions associated with an estimated 45 percent of U.S. deaths per year. Texas A&M biologists Richard Gomer and Darrell Pilling have collaborated in recent years on several SAP-related advances, from establishing Promedior Inc Continue reading

Down syndrome: Behind the scenes of genetics, leukemia

Down syndrome: Behind the scenes of genetics, leukemia

Children affected by trisomy 21 (or Down syndrome) are 50 to 500 times more likely to develop leukemia than other children. A group of geneticists working in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) focused for many years on the genetic characteristics of Down syndrome. Continue reading

Stress during pregnancy can be passed down through generations, rat study shows

Stress during pregnancy can be passed down through generations, rat study shows

To better understand problems during pregnancies today, we should look to the experiences of our ancestors, research published in the open access journal BMC Medicine suggests. Scientists investigating pregnancies in four generations of rats show that inherited epigenetic effects of stress could affect pregnancies for generations. Continue reading

Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not a new ‘Hobbit’ human

Flores bones show features of Down syndrome, not a new ‘Hobbit’ human

In October 2004, excavation of fragmentary skeletal remains from the island of Flores in Indonesia yielded what was called “the most important find in human evolution for 100 years.” Its discoverers dubbed the find Homo floresiensis, a name suggesting a previously unknown species of human. Now detailed reanalysis by an international team of researchers including Robert B. Eckhardt, professor of developmental genetics and evolution at Penn State, Maciej Henneberg, professor of anatomy and pathology at the University of Adelaide, and Kenneth Hsü, a Chinese geologist and paleoclimatologist, suggests that the single specimen on which the new designation depends, known as LB1, does not represent a new species. Continue reading

One injection stops diabetes in its tracks: Treatment reverses symptoms of type 2 diabetes in mice without side effects

One injection stops diabetes in its tracks: Treatment reverses symptoms of type 2 diabetes in mice without side effects

In mice with diet-induced diabetes — the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans — a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. The discovery by Salk scientists, published today in the journal Nature , could lead to a new generation of safer, more effective diabetes drugs Continue reading

One injection stops diabetes in its tracks: Treatment reverses symptoms of type 2 diabetes in mice without side effects

One injection stops diabetes in its tracks: Treatment reverses symptoms of type 2 diabetes in mice without side effects

In mice with diet-induced diabetes — the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans — a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. The discovery by Salk scientists, published today in the journal Nature , could lead to a new generation of safer, more effective diabetes drugs Continue reading

Live kidney donors face ‘pointless’ insurance troubles

Live kidney donors face ‘pointless’ insurance troubles

Healthy living kidney donors often face pointless post-donation hurdles when seeking or changing health or life insurance, according to results of a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers. “Living donors are some of the healthiest people in the United States Continue reading

New assay to spot fake malaria drugs could save thousands of lives

New assay to spot fake malaria drugs could save thousands of lives

Chemists and students in science and engineering at Oregon State University have created a new type of chemical test, or assay, that’s inexpensive, simple, and can tell whether or not one of the primary drugs being used to treat malaria is genuine — an enormous and deadly problem in the developing world. The World Health Organization has estimated that about 200,000 lives a year may be lost due to the use of counterfeit anti-malarial drugs Continue reading